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Work in Progress - June 2022

coffee table with unfinished knit and crochet projects

 

 

Catch up with previous coffee table updates here.

This month I've finished two projects and started two new ones.

 

grey cowl

 

The first finished project is the Feathered Friends Cowl for the Pittenweem Community Craft Project.

Designed by Sabine Gruschow, the pattern is available to buy on Ravelry. Money raised will be donated to the project and split between this year's charities - Kilminning Nature Reserve project in Crail (East Neuk) and the DEC Ukraine Crisis Appeal.. 

Cowls made using Sabine's design will also be available to buy during the Festival in August.

The pattern is written for 4ply (see Sabine's one in Vivacious 4ply here)  but I made this one in Rowan Alpaca Soft DK. It is a nice size (I cast on 20 sitches less and used a 4mm needle - remember I'm a loose knitter) and sits neatly at the neck.

 

The second finished project was inspired by a customer's cowlDissymmetry Cowl by Elizabeth Sullivan is a very very quick knit. It's an asymmetrical rectangley shape with buttons to create a small cowl. This is what it looks like laid flat...

 

lilac rectangle cowl

 

I only had the buttons to sew on last month and after a bit of phaffing about I chose different coloured ones.

I used just one ball of Rico Melange Chunky to knit this and as a quick knit it would be great for gift knitting.

 

lilac cowlDissymmetry Cowl available to buy on Ravelry

 

The first new project was also inspired by a customer.

Desert Ripple Wrap by SweaterFreak (available to buy on Ravelry) is a stunning large wrap which combines garter stitch and a simple ripple effect. It starts as a triangle but ends up a rectangle.

 

desert ripple wrap

 

It uses two colours. Currently I've decided on my main colour - Love Your Wallpaper in Don't Talk Back. I haven't quite decided on the contrast shade yet. Maybe Urchin in Choufunga 4ply or undyed Tibetan 4ply.

 

The second and third new projects are part of my plan to do more crochet.

 

wonky crochet
The very first thing I crocheted 😆

 

In the past, I have made four things in crochet (including the practice swatch above):

 

I get the theory of crochet but my skills are beginner at best. My main problem is knowing where to stick the hook.

To improve my skills and be a better help to customers in the shop I have decided to move beyond the theory and into the practical. So of course I jumped right in with two crocheted garments. 😆

 

crochet rectangle

 

The first one is Tumbestone Tee by Clare Blowers. This is a simple boxy t-shirt made with a front and a back and then sewn up.

The stitch is half treble into the back loop of the stitch which gives a lovely chain stitch effect. I'm using WYS Elements DK and it has a lovely drape.

 

The second crochet project is a jumper called Caveat Crop by Lydia Morrow. This is a big project. But, I am using an aran weight yarn (Woolcraft Heather Aran) and it is worked in treble stitch, so it's working up quickly.

 

crochet jumper

 

However! I have had to rip it back a lot. Each part has been worked many many times. 

So far I've learned to do:

  • treble stitch into the front loop of the stitch
  • increasing to create raglan shaping
  • front post treble to create the rib effect at the neck
  • short row shaping at the neck to raise the back

The main issue I had with this project was knowing where to put my hook. For several rows I added extra stitches at the back and had to rip it back. I've since realised that I should look at the row below to see where the 'post' of the stitch is and then put my hook into the loop above it.

I've had to work really hard on both these projects to the detriment of my other WiPs. So no progress on anything else really. Although I have made some progress on my Melting Marl shawl. I've done another set of increases and I now have over 400  stitches on the needles. 😬

 

multicoloured shawl

 

And there's no update on the Embroidery Journal.

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